Are You A Giver or A Taker?

This article was originally published on likkylavji.com

Studies done with over 30,000 people have shown 3 types of personalities exist in the workplace: Givers, Takers & Matchers. So which one do you identify yourself closely with?

The Takers are those who will only do things that will benefit them. These people usually don’t last long in the work place due to their nature of seeing value in only what benefits them rather than giving value to others. The “taking” can be very satisfying and rewarding in the immediate term but over long periods the gratification withers away as no sense of belonging with their commrads develops when there is no giving.

The Matchers will do something for others so as long as there is payback for them further down the road. “You scratch my back and I will scratch yours”. Although this is a safe way of being, it may not be the most result orientated. Trying to maintain an even balance of give and take is like a scorecard for everything they do for others, rather than just offering value by placing other people’s interest first.

The Givers although sacrifice themselves for benefit of others, they are known to provide betterment of an organization, empowering their team, creating culture, even improving team productivity and reduce employee turnover rates.

Overtime, it is the Givers who will end up at the top of the success ladder.

Givers also have the most burnout as they tend to over expend themselves. So how do organizations protect the Givers? Encourage them to be “help seekers” and help them recognize when they need to ask for help. Allow them to block off window of time to get their own work done.

Finding the Givers is rare, but once you do have them in your organization you will find them to make a difference in the workplace. They see it as a priority to make their colleagues matter and help in their successes. These rare gems have found the greater meaning and purpose (The Why) in their work because they believe it truly makes a difference.

(Author: Sam Lavji)